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>> welcome to the "journal" here on dw. acknowledgment, no apology -- france's president says french colonial rule in algeria was brutal. >> the united nations warns that the fighting in syria is becoming a sectarian war as yet more islamist fighters arrived from abroad. >> it is 200 years since the grimm brothers' first published stories that continue to bring trembling and joy into children's lives -- the grimm brothers first published stories that continue to bring trembling and joy into children's lives. the french president is in algeria to commemorate that country's 50th anniversary of independence from france following a bloody war that cost 1.5 million algerians and tens of thousands of french their lives. >> hollande praised algeria's steps toward democracy as paris looks to deepen economic ties with the oil-rich former french colony in north africa. >> enthusiastic crowds greeted the french president as he walked the streets of the capital algiers. despite his security, many onlookers even got a chance to shake hollande's hand, seemed unconcerned by the bitter histor
demanding that the rebel alliance and hostilities and calling on france to deploy forces to defend them. they fear the capital could fall within days. 600,000 people live in the capital and they are vulnerable. >> we have suffered a lot because of the war. the people have suffered a lot and seen many atrocities. >> i'm scared of war. nobody wishes for war in any country. everybody wants peace rather than war. >> the regional neighbors agreed on friday to dispatch a contingent of soldiers to intervene in the fighting. representatives from the 10- nation economic committee of central african states were not able to say how many troops would be deployed or when it would be sent, but diplomats agreed that time was running short. >> we want to go quickly but also correctly. because of that, we have met the rebel movement and the general also spoke to the army coalition to make sure that things go well and fast. >> the french president pled for international help from his colonial masters in france. the government forces in paris insist they are in the country to protect french interests and
forget that israel fought the 1967 war not with american arms but with french weaponry. france was their principal ally. before 1967, one israeli prime minister one time for one hour had visited the white house. it wasn't israel's founder. june 1964. today ariel sharon or any israeli prime minister comes to washington, it's obvious he will march into the white house. that began that very, very close relationship, that cooperation began in the aftermath of 1967, not before that. >> as you acknowledge, one more book on the six-day war. there have been a lot of them. what do you have new? what kind of things? >> look at my bibliography. i always encounter that question why we need another book on the 1967 war. the principle reason is the phenomenon of the 30-year rule. that is the rule that attained to most western style democracies in the united states in britain and canada and in israel which holds that after 30 years the majority of diplomatic documents previously classified as top secret are declassified and become accessible to researchers. once you have documents, it opens u
. >> juliet: president obama continues to push for tax hikes on the rich. and france lost a bid to raise taxes and he want today raise to 75%. now, there weren't a lot of people he was focused on, really not that much money, he was going to raise, but the fact is he wanted the french judicial council, however, said it would have been excessive and unconstitutional. joining us-- >> sorry, dave. >> dave: and for tax foundation from the heritage foundation. >> juliet: good morning, curtis. >> good morning. >> dave: what's the deal here, the decision made is not unconstitutional, but bottom line, bad for the economy? i think we can learn from this? >> that's right, the court has bailed them out. and the tax increase, 75% rate was going to really damage the french economy. the french economy's already strugglingling and adding on the economy would be worse. >> i'm looking at it, expected to be a temporary two year measure and affect 1500 people and raise less than 661 million dollars. >> but the revenue we brought in, and what it would have done, it would have reduced the incentives, and working an
magazine editor anna wintour oz our next u.s -- as our next u.s. ambassador to the u.k. or maybe to france. white house with press secretary jay carney defended the idea, insisting that nondiplomats like ms. wintour can make good envoys. >> what qualities does the president look for when he's going to pick an ambassador? an important ally like france or the u.k.? >> you know, i think that the president in all of his personnel appointments looks for talent, wisdom and character in his appointees, and he would do that regardless of the position. >> is it important for a diplomat to be diplomatic? [laughter] >> one of the, i mean, another way of addressing that is to answer the question there have been enormously effective diplomats in this country's history who have not necessarily risen through the diplomatic corps. we had one of the greatest diplomats of his generation pass away not long ago, richard holbrooke, and i think everyone who knew him or sat across from the table from him would agree he was not by anyone's traditional definition particularly diplomatic. >> no. but he was also a b
, to struggle against the oppression of my people and to struggle against the racism. >> france is seen 19th consecutive rise of consecutiveto 3.1 million people -- consecutive rise in unemployment to 3.1 million people. >> times are tough on the french high street, which means second- hand stores are doing good business. many shoppers came here to buy their christmas presents. now that the holiday is over, the trade is in the opposite direction. >> i have been waiting for people to bring back their christmas present. >> the manager is preparing for a busy few days as people discover they received gifts they do not want or brought -- bought things that cannot afford. >> we have to explain to people we can't give full price for the items they bring in. the shop has to provide. we try to make just a small margin on new goods. >> it is an expensive time of year. the school holidays have another week to one, and keeping children occupied can be a costly business. many families can't afford to take them ice skating or to the theater. at times when people are tightening their belts, it is the litt
. france was against us going to war and we were against france being against us. it got ugly with the un. people were saying we don't eat french fries and french wine. we have freedom fries. that lasted about a week. i was mad with the maker. he put me in an awkward position. we exchanged views about it. he was an adversary. i couldn't let him become an enemy because i meet him later. turn him into a friend at some point. that's what he did with me. i don't like to accumulate enemies for that. i rather have people i disagree with and if we can work it out, i have an adversary and a friend. >> you talked about anger. you are flown anger as are a lot of great leaders and you learn how to control about it and you say it's so important for somebody that's running an office or an army or a nation. >> i think all of us have a zone where sometimes you are a little annoyed and sometimes you are really happy. if your staff and followers understand that, everything is fine. you blow up and get mad. you have to be very, very careful about it. you can't get mad all the time. you create a totally neg
the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in stormy chicago, shriver's name again came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on a flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family, still grieving from the recent death of robert, raised an objection in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success in repairing the alliance with france weakened birdies agreement about the vietnam -- by disagreement about the vietnam war, had prompted president pix son to retain him -- nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when democratic nominee george mcgovern was forced to drop his running mate, and eventually through a process of elimination, designated sargent shriver as his choice for vice president. the election was a disaster for mcgovern and shriver who only won massachusetts and the district of columbia. but perhaps the final word came 18 months later as the watergate scandal unfolded and bumper stickers appeared. they carried an outline of the bay state, and wi
action. france called for aid, nothing happened. turkey called for safe haven, nothing happened. everybody is looking to the united states. unfortunately, it is the same position since august of last year, which focused more on the target sanctions and all of that. unless there is actually a change in the u.s. position to take more action, i do not think something will change in the military. building a central command of the free syrian army, that needs training, international assistance. that is something only the united states can do. >> do you have a follow up question? >> my question is, you have said the days of asad are numbered and it is only a matter of time before he falls. what can we expect to happen with them when he falls? will we see a scene similar to libya where his body is dragged through the streets? will he be tried in syria? what do you envision to happen, and what do you hope to happen? >> that is difficult to answer. we know the days of the regime is approaching. that may take one year or more. we see that with the reluctance and the hesitance of the inter
supplies. the rebels have also scored on the diplomatic front as britain, france, turkey and the gulf cooperation council recently recognized their umbrella group the national coalition of syrian revolutionary and oppositional forces as the legitimate representative of the syrian people. and now the u.s. may go along as well 37 in washington today secretary of state hillary clinton was guarded as she discussed the rebel's recent successes. >> opposition in syria is now caping of holding ground, and they are better equipped and more able to bring the fight to the government forces. i don't know that you can say that for the entire country it is yet at a tipping point but it certainly seems that the regime will be much harder pressed in the next months. >> eliot: in cairo protesters continue to press the regime of president mohammed morsi to relinquish the new powers he announced for himself this week. some protesters also object to the new draft egyptian constitution, which was finished friday and sent to morsi for review. meanwhile in israel you prime prime minister benjamin netanyahu
great britain and france who just sided with him on gaza and the united states, and put him in a terrible predicament in the challenge with iran. the domestic equation with this netanyahu coalition is what drives everyone batty. it seems that he's far more interested in worrying about how many seats his coalition is going to win rather than the fate of israel when it comes to its international posture. i say that, it's very hard for me to say that, but that's how i feel. >> eliot: you would think that he would want to keep the international coalition sympathetic to him and show restraint after that vote saying we won't do a b c we'll hold our nose. we know this is more visual than substantive but we won't jeopardize the fate of the peace talks. what do you think is the relationship between the president and netanyahu. >> the president realizes israel's fate is important to the united states. that's why he sided with israel when it came to israel and the missiles being lobbed towards israel. i'm sure he'll remain confident in his commitment to israel, when it comes to having
allen with the top stories from "politico." and mika should be jetting in from the south of france just in time to say hello to her father. first, though, let's send it to bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good morning to you, joe. you got to d.c. a day too late. yesterday, it had to have been the warmest day you'll see probably till about april. it was 72 degrees yesterday in washington, d.c. it was even in the 60s all the way as far north as buffalo, syracuse and rochester. things are coming back to reality. cold front's heading through. chillier air is arriving, especially western new york. some showers out ahead of that front. if you're leaving the house now in maine, coastal new hampshire down through boston out on the cape, you're going to get light showers over the next hour or on two. you also have a few showers that will be ending shortly. look how warm it is when you step out your door. even at this hour, philadelphia. but look back to your west. the colder air is arriving. already in the 30s, pittsburgh and buffalo. and even buffalo could get snow showers later on
to sports. >> lance armstrong was stripped of 7 tour de france titles this fall and the only american to have won cycling's biggest race, started a group called change cycling now and pushing to take over the international cycling federation, he won fair and clean in the '80s and dramatically and wants it change cycling. if anyone can do it and change the culture of doping in sports, it can be someone like greg lamond. >> paul: james. >> a hit to michigan governor rick snyder he would sign right to work legislation soon on his desk. anyone in in america should be able to choose to support a union and choose not to. >> that's big news, potentially for economically in michigan, and means a lot more companies might be willing to locate in michigan. and remember, if you have your own hit or miss, please send it to us at jer@foxnews.com and follow us on twitter@jer on fnc. that's it for the show and thanks to my ponl and all of you for watching, i'm paul gigot, we hope to see you here next week. >> on fox news watch. >> coach ryan,'s got a problem. he has three quarterbacks. the same prob
from both france and in washington sent a telegram to the embassies, which is not far away and i might telegram there was a message from kissinger, secretary of the state department, telling us the israelis, wait. hold your horses. do not take action because kissinger is going to move on with provided doctors. when the telegram was sent from the state department to the embassy during yom kippur, the egyptian and syrian armies were already on their way to destroy the jewish state. that is an example of a mistake because the leader at the time, she was afraid to take a preemptive attack. she was afraid to hold the reserve because she said i don't know what will be the reaction in washington. and dr. kissinger was very strong. nixon was going down, he was going up and she was afraid from his reaction. because of her approach, we almost lost the world. that is why today we do with the issue of iran, we have to take the decision which is good for israel. maybe it will not be popular in the u.n. for sure. everything you say about israel and the standard of the one sponsored by u.s. money of
was france was working with a shiite sect, which is a minority, who were to look after the sunnies, who are the majority. 10% or shias of another sect. assad belongs to this sect ands the military is from this sect and the elite are from this sect. correct? >> partial limit he would not be able to rule if it was only them in the inner circle. >> they basically in control. >> they're dominant in the military apparatus but they have also done a very good job, started under his father. of coe opting many sunnies, christians in particular and others, into the apparatus. >> and the sunni elite, of course. they're trying to maintain power. they're a minority group, against this widening majority who is now getting influence from the outside. please set it up, what are the influences from the outside who are taking sides and how is that affecting? it seems like they're at an impasse. the killingings continue and the massacres are increasing. almost 700,000 refugees in three countries that surround them by january or so. at least that's the projection. people are fleeing but there's a lot more
burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in the future so today we have a united germany that trades immensely with poland and has had a wretch most wall -- to approach what and where the european union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem but to berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them so the question arises and this goes back to the
of the jews who lived in the arab and muslim countries reside in israel mostly or in some cases france. the other side of the story is the christian communities that did until very recently. to talk about the iraqi christian community. it was about 1 million during 2003 and now it is that 40,000. they have suffered grievous amounts. last christmas with the catholic church in baghdad? "this is it" is a grim subjects but say something about how you approach this in the book. you have done a lot of research of the situation of christians and other countries. but this dovetails that you may not have happened upon. >> guest: right. first of all, i came across a subject when i was at a conference when i was at hudson. i had a blank spot on my calendar and wandered into a workshop. i heard stories of people who have fled the arab countries. it turned into an emotional scene. after the speakers of the panel q&a were people we've been talking about leaving their parents parents, homes, grandparents behind. i had no idea what they were talking about. before israel i read history books and there
by the hurricane. donald trump is not a supporter of pesident obama but why anawonter to france. mr. trump here to explain shortly. ♪ ♪ why is it that the most impressive technology often comes with a set of equally impressive instructions ? shouldn't something that's truly advanced, not need much explanation at all ? with the nokia lumia 822 on verizon, there's not much to learn because it's powered by windows... to let you do more than you ever imagined on your smartphone. exclusively with data sense-- a feature that makes the most of your plan. only on verizon. till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like ourender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. >> gretchen: 52 minutes after the top of the hour. who ever said there is no such thing with a free lunch dined with uncle sam.
in the world. france, 2.08. the u.s., 2.06, ireland, 2.01. in red, they're looking at next generations that will get smaller and smaller and smaller. the uk, well under 2. china, 1.55. we know they've actually implemented policies because they want to control population. in the bigger picture, fooling around with mother nature in this way could have hugely negative consequences. russia 1.43 and germany, 1.41. at the very bottom of the list, other than certain countries where the information is not available, the bottom of this list was singapore at .78. i know we're dealing with so many issues nowadays and i blow a gasket over many of them, whether fiscal cliff, unfunded liabilities, at some point, growth is the answer. when you start considering where the engines of growth have been and what their population declines may be, it makes one wonder, where is the horsepower from global growth will come from and this at some point needs to affect the picks in your stock portfolio. back to you. >> rick, i'll take it from you, rick santelli. >>> even starbucks is worried about the fiscal clif
britain germany and france has moved from the country side to the cities two, hundred million people. and they don't have the same status as those who live there of initially, officially, you have an urban middle class 300 million people and growing .. this is a society that has got a lot of pushes and pulls going on, and my worry is that if they find it difficult to manage that, they resort to nationalism, you have seen a little bit of that toward japan, and the problem is, that that wells up from the people. that is not the government and the government has tried to use some of these demonstrations to sort of make a point about japan, and they nearly lost control on a couple of occasions, so i -- i think that -- i don't think of china as an enemy, it is a competitor. it is a partner in many ways. but we also have to work with the chinese in terms of how do we -- how do we persuade them to become a responsible steak holder? .. and sort of abide by the rules? china's rise is not necessarily disadvantages you to the united states. >> rose: it is not a zero sum a game? >> no, i don't
compensation and gorbachev in effect says get real. we don't want a war with britain and france. what you talking about. we are scaring everybody else, that is giving them an excuse for an arms race. if we get by with forcing us into an arms race we're going to lose it. exactly what president reagan assigned to delay tactic. i would say people at the time, reagan didn't pay that much attention to details. his eyes would glaze over, numbers of missiles and warheads and stuff and fruit, didn't look at those things. he concentrated on basically how do i understand a fellow? how do i convince him to do something that is in his own interests? his current policies are not. we spent much more time and i think effective time talking to reagan about where gorbachev was coming from. what his pressures were, and one of the things we needed to do was in this process to convince him we are not out to do them in. among other things, reagan said in the same memo human-rights was too important to carry out entirely as a public policy. we are much too upfront. if we confront him publicly no politician can
, there is talk among some countries-- the u.s., britain, and france-- about the possibility of increased sanctions. it's an open question as to whether that will happen. do you think anything can dissuade north korea, one of the most sanctioned countries in the world, from continuing down this path realistically? >> i think it's the wrong path. any kind of sanction will not work. if, in fact, economic sanction especially were to force north korea to give in, north korea would have given in many times over. so so economic sanctions will not bring the desired consequence. so the -- we're talking about sanctions. what other sanctions are there? we have exhausted all sanctions. but north korea is not -- this time around no one is talking about possible demise collapse of the system. and when the grandfather died and the father died and all talks about it, about the possibility of the arab rising and then system collapse. but that is not going to happen. >> warner: professor park, thank you so much and david wright. thanks. >> thank you. >> woodruff: online you can see photographs of the cele
administration did not take the attitude, we don't care if communism comes to power in france, italy, or japan, as long as there's fair elections, that's all we care about. that was not their attitude. in fact, they were willing to pour covert american funds into political campaigns which, on some level could be seen as prejudice to the free and fair elections, which i think they under correctly to be in the long term interest to preserve democracy and freedom in those countries. we have to rethink the checks we put on our behavior today where we are terrified of having the cia, for example, be involved in covert funding of modern elements in the muslim world, in part, baa we are rightly concerned that cia involvement is impossible to keep secret in today's world of wikileaks, but i, you know, unfortunately, our enemies show no self-imposed limits on them, and out there practice active dollar diplomacy on interests not congruent to our own, and we are standing on the sidelines. it's a lesson that -- this is just one example of many oh i think we are failing to wage political warfare. i only ha
like syria, egypt, britain, france, you had to hold together this coalition which was an usual coalition, so to speak. the administration jim baker got u.n. sanction for this operation. and it was just, we had no headquarters in the region. right now the central command has a headquarters in qatar. there was fog like that. the arab states didn't really want the americans there and on a permanent basis. so we had, all of this had to be moved first to saudi arabia not region first from the defensive operation and then in an offensive operation. so just months and months for this to even, just to prepare for this. >> and he was in charge of that. but now he was as we lewded to in the piece also criticized for making some strategic mistakes. what were those? >> well, there were well two goals primary goal its one was to evict the iraqi forces from kuwait which was done in the 100 hour ground war after six weeks of bombing, remember that. but the other one was to destroy saddam hussein's offensive powers, primarily his republican guard force. because the thinking was if you didn't d
like syria egypt, britain, france you had to hold together this coalition which was an usual coalition, so to speak. the administration jim baker got u.n. sanction for this operation. and it was just we had no headquarters in the region. right now the central command has a headquarters in qatar. there was fog like that. the arab states didn't really want the americans there and on a permanent basis. so we had, all of this had to be moved first to saudi arabia not region first from the defensive operation and then in an offensive operation. so just months and months for this to even just to prepare for this. >> and he was in charge of that. but now he was as we lewded to in the piece also criticized for making some strategic mistakes. what were those? >> well, there were well two goals primary goal its one was to evict the iraqi forces from kuwait which was done in the 100 hour ground war after six weeks of bombing, remember that. but the other one was to destroy saddam hussein's offensive powers primarily his republican guard force. because the thinking was if you didn't destroy them t
. what was going to disagreements. the disagreements that canada, france and mexico and many other countries. but there's a mechanism we can all go to for a mutual refereeing of those issues are the wto is one way we can do that and the president has insisted that we do that. [inaudible] [inaudible] >> i'm sorry, i didn't have a chance to read the article. so i'm not familiar with everything else has mentioned the article. it's a question two minutes before the election there was this big tough on china team. >> in terms of the military, and that was announced almost a year before that. but what set off the discussion at the pit it was the announcement of joint exercises with australia and rotating about 2000 marines to australia. i don't think cheney should be fearful of 2000 marines in australia, but a lot of the dvd in terms of military collaboration with countries in the asia-pacific region involve responding to disasters at giving people the technical ability to respond to natural disasters and disaster relief. our engagement with other countries throughout the asia-pacific re
five, france. taxes are an issue there. i think the election of francois alaund and his rate on the top end as well as some of the other things he's doing in france, lowering the retirement age, this is sort of a litmus test in some ways and it's important. maybe richard can tell me i need to learn more about the british tax code. icons on the edge. a number of names you know at home, jcpenney, best buy stock has been hammered, the maker of the blackberry, once iconic, now struggling. >> they're gone. >> they're not gone. >> last one. congratulations. >> they're struggling, and i think it's the end of an era for some companies. the $25 billion bank settlement, a huge deal. some people said it was not enough. whatever your thoughts are, it was a big story. facebook, you remember them? they have come back in the last six weeks. everyone thought this was an ipo that was going to soar. >> who manages that company? >> mark zuckerberg. that guy right there. >> poorly, i would submit. >> he built it, so who are we to judge, right? maybe the public company is a different story, but that ipo flo
stay on the pathway we're currently on we're headed to the nanny state which is france and greece. that concerns me a great deal and the country will not be able to deal with the leader of the free world if we continue on that pathway. >> what would that look like for the average citizen? >> the average citizen more and more their life would be dependent on uncle sam. the difference between america and the rest of the world is our founding fathers placed the highest priority on individual enterprise and individual spirit. if people are willing to say my dependent upon my own willingness to work hard and impact the process we will continue to have that driving force that makes us the strongest country in the world. if we're not careful, we will walk away from it and soon, unfortunately, we'll be like france. >> do you have any sense there is a generational sense on views how the government should serve the public among younger americans than it is among baby boomers and older? >> i'm hopeful we can convince the cross section of the younger generation that their contribution to our
in the west bank. the u.s., france and the uk say they will set back decisions. the u.n. gave palestinians nonmember observer state status. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has not publicly acknowledged approval, but a senior government official says he has sign off on those plans. >>> in washington, the calendar is coming ever closer to that fiscal cliff. we'll hear where each side stands and if we are any closer to a deal today. i'm going to dream about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. when we got marr
of the united states or the rights of men experience of france. the bother us with the rule of law and its -- judicial independence. rule oft bother us with law and a judicial independence. to understand its relevance, and the mainland is destined to follow it, but to learn more and be stimulated by it -- i look forward to the discussion. [applause] >> thank you, ambassador huntsman. thank you, john thornton for your exceptional china program. thank you to colleagues for organizing this wonderful day of activities. whatever this may -- whatever this event may have been called, it is above all a celebration of he weifang. he is brilliant, he is learned, he is courageous. he is a tenacious person with the soul of a saint in fighting justice, fighting for justice. he is a soul of wit who somehow convinces us that fighting for fundamental change in china is a joyful activity. [laughter] the tweet andd by sparks of with the flow from him as readily as sparks flow from an iron factory. as china watchers know, to forge iron, one must be strong. he weifang is strong. the panel has been asked under
-enter france in the iranian internal affairs. it requires president obama to make that kind of concession, at least verbally, i think the president will go for that. maybe the president thought the key to getting a nuclear deal was to go out of his way publicly to assure the iranian regime, the islamic republic of iran, that we had in fact no business interfering and we are fine with the status quo. what are your thoughts on that? what you think the impact of that would be? >> i actually attended berkeley. [laughter] bat. >> one of the challenges in the international community is if there is some sort of nuclear deal -- the man at the nuclear deal is signed, a new phase of the arms control problem emerges which is called compliance. there is the question of whether the treaty will happen. how do you sustain pressure on other aspects of sirenian miss behavior in light of the nuclear deal? human rights is one and i will come back to that but today, the islamic republic stands convicted criminal lawyer accused, but convicted of terrorism on the american homeland with the conviction of the pl
person with a ph.d. in engineering from france. dick also started to all different committees. -- they also started 12 different committees. judiciary, committee on finance, and they were working on a number of products. i love today to talk about those projects those councils are working on. >> can we say a few words between the relationship of this council and the military? what we specifically referred to as the free syrian army? >> a few months ago they found it coalesce. it is headed up by the inspector general. all of those groups do maintain their separate identities. they are all fighting under the banner of this council. i would say the relationship is characterized it has two characteristics, if corroborative one and a competitive one. if it were not for that there would be no federated areas. everyone depends on the fsa to keep the assad regime from entering the city. that is the cooperative aspect. this is going into the future. you have an emergent civil society that is trying to govern this and provide basic goods and services. when i was an uphill i saw piles up
gross domestic product on healthcare. the next highest was france and germany. united king come 9.6. and germany and france on many measures are getting better healthcare out comes than we are. and we know if you fast forward to 2012 we're not spending that, we're over 18%. 1 in every 6 dollars in this economy is going to healthcare. and however much one saves on healthcare, 40% of that flows through to the federal government because the federal government is paying 40% of healthcare in this country, actually something more than that. there is lots of room to save money in this healthcare system and there by save money in medicare and medicaid. we're talking about a very small percentage about what we intend to spend over the next ten years in the savings that are being discussed. the same is true on discretionary savings. the president called for $200 billion. discretionary savings on top of the billion that has been done. but if we put it in perspective we're going to spend in the domestic accounts in the next ten years $11.6 trillion. so a $200 billion savings is 1.7% of what w
contributing countries. european union, france, others have already begun to really engage with the malian forces, so it isn't as if there is an abstinence of support for them in the intervening period. >> what lessons have we learned, if i might, ms. dory and mr. gast, i think the mission just celebrated the 50th anniversary. we were actively engaged in the training a good thing as a part of the very probably democracy support and in trying to create and sustain a cultural democracy what lessons are there that we might learn going forward about political failures and more on domestic issues in the work rather abrupt requirement that we break off relations and support here has created a great difficulty with regional consequences. what lessons would you suggest we learn? the best of times mali is a country in crisis. it is a country that ranks of the model of a dozen. the assistant secretary carson mentioned 90% of the population is in the south and that population is also in the need of services. the government hasn't included both in the delivery of services as well as the governments of
states army in the great world war i. he wanted to get to france as soon as he could and so he volunteered to be in the ambulance service. what he did when he got to europe was rescue and pick up other dough boys in europe out of those trenches and get them behind, take them back behind american lines so that they could be taken care of their wounds and he also picked up many of our americans, 114,000 to be exact that died in the great world war i. he was allowed or was able to come back to america alive he made it through the war. although many, as i mentioned, did not. many americans when they came home from the great war over there, as cohen said, difed the new. they picked up in europe in fact many of them a great number of them depride the spanish flu, almost as many as died in europe itself. frank buckles then went to work and during his work, he went to the philippines. when he was in the philippines, the japanese invaded in world war ii. he was captured and put in a prisoner of war camp for three and a half years. he was about to be executed and the americans came and l
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